Rosie Gabrielle, A Canadian Biker Visiting Pakistan, Is Falling In Love With The Country, One City At A Time

By Mashal Abbasi | 23 Feb, 2019

On December 21, 2018 Rosie Gabrielle arrived in Lahore, where she was welcomed with traditional Pakistani gusto. Dhol waaley, gulaab ke phool and of course, some Punjabi bhangra.

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PAKISTAN: My first impression . . Before coming to Pakistan, I was asked; Why? Why would you go there? What’s so good about this country? I was told it was too DANGEROUS. That the people were bad and I would not be able to travel alone there, and I would be mistreated as a woman. I was fed fear driven lies from the media and people who followed the propaganda, never having the personal experience for themselves in this country. So, what is the truth? what is my personal experience and first impression of Pakistan and the people….. My heart is bursting. Words cannot even express the amount of joy in my heart that I have experienced from the love and generosity of these people. I knew coming here that I would encounter “nice” people. I was told from many fellow travelers just how great the people were here. But what I encountered was not this. There are no words in the English language that can describe the essence of the Pakistani people. Since arriving, I have witnessed the most sincere and deepest kindness and generosity from the local people. Respectful, honorable, gracious individuals, who have no intentions other than to serve others and to treat everyone as family and as one. I am so excited to share my experiences throughout my travels here. Soon, I will be picking up a bike and traveling extensively across the country, sharing with you the true heart of Pakistan. The PEOPLE. I hope to change the mindsets that have been conditioned and indoctrinated to think negative views on this country. Follow me on this beautiful journey and see the true side of this country. WELCOME TO PAKISTAN !

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What is she doing here? Well, the Canadian citizen is touring the country, one city at a time.

That in itself isn’t something new, but Rosie is doing something different – she’s traveling across the country on a motorcycle!

That’s right, she’s riding through Pakistan, and for the most part, solo. Bike enthusiasts curious to know what she’s riding – it’s a red BMW F700 GS.

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Everyone told me it was too dangerous to come to Pakistan as a single female, let alone ride a motorcycle across the country. Now 1500 km’s into my tour I can tell you first hand what it’s like to travel Pakistan as a solo female and what I’ve experienced so far. Countless smiles and cheers of joy as I pass people and they realize it’s a female riding. Numerous offers to stay in locals homes wherever I stop, families are always inviting me to stay with them. When I stop for chai or snacks at a store, most often someone will buy it for me, or the owner will not let me pay, saying I’m a guest in their country and they would love to gift this to me. Food food and more food! wherever I go, I’m offered to eat wonderful home cooked food 😋 or offered gifts of food from street vendors as I pass by. Everyone wants to say hello and ask where I’m from and are curious what I think about Pakistan. They want me to know that Islam is a Peace and love and that I am accepted just the way I am. I’ve been gifted many things now by the people and families I stay with and been given the highest attention and hospitality, even if they don’t have much to give, they make sure I’m happy. And they give with their whole hearts. So many beautiful connections & heart felt moments, I have truly fallen in love with the people here💗 This is Pakistan. This is the country of Peace and Love. And this is my unedited experience so far. As a solo female traveling by motorcycle. Pakistan has suffered greatly in past years due to the continuous negative image the media portrays. Since many years now, they aren’t used to seeing tourists. So they’re overjoyed to see a foreigner. Not because I‘m anyone special, but because it gives them hope. Hope that Pakistan will once again be recognized for the beautiful country it is and the true heart of the people will be seen. People have labeled Pakistan as dangerous or that the people aren’t good. And I’ve seen how that personally affects the people here, it brings them to tears to have such accusations, and it breaks my heart to know what is said and how they’re treated abroad having experienced the culture first hand and how they’ve treated me

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Women aren’t commonly seen riding motorcycles in Pakistan, let alone foreigners, but Gabrielle has been met with mostly positive reactions. That isn’t, of course, to take away from why women here aren’t seen using bikes as a means of transport. The problems that exist here are very much real and pressing.

However, Gabrielle’s experience is definitely refreshing to hear about. Speaking to MangoBaaz regarding the same, here’s what she said:

“I get a lot of shocked faces, a lot of smiles. People in Pakistan seem to be very excited to see me on a motorcycle. The funniest reaction was that of a 6-year-old, who asked if I was a boy or a girl when he saw me riding the bike.”

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Hey fam jam ! Just a heads up- I have officially started my tour ! I’m behind on my IG stories ( sorry hard to keep up) but I have just done a live video on Instagram and encourage you all to check it out ! Basically it’s just me walking the streets here at night alone, to show you – just how SAFE it is here. And now, 5 days solo on the road and I can’t tell you how amazing everyone has been along the way, and just how safe I really feel traveling alone here and how well cared for I am. I will be doing more live videos in the future. If you missed today’s and have any questions, please feel free to drop them below. Unfortunately I stopped attending to my “other” inbox, as I’m too overwhelmed at the moment with everything and rather enjoy my time being present. But I do appreciate all of the love sent. I will try to respond to each question below at least. As always, Thank you for following along and for all the love and support 🙏💗

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The love for riding motorcycles is in her blood.

“My father rode,” she tells us. “He passed away when I was 2, but I know he was very adventurous, and it’s something that’s been passed down to me.” She insists that riding on a motorcycle is the best way to experience all of the sights and sounds of a place.

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MERRY CHRISTMAS from PAKISTAN ! It was absolutely an honor and a treat to be hosted by @theharleystore on Christmas Day. It’s always difficult to be away from home during the holidays, but the HOG group spared nothing when it came to making us feel completely welcomed, at home, and celebrated. Dozens of Individuals from around the region gathered early Christmas Day to accompany us for an exciting ride across Lahore. Ending our day at @sa.gardens where we had a special BBQ lunch prepared, festive decorations, snowman cake and all! The Christmas spirit of fellowship and love was in abundant flow and received with deepest gratitude. . . In Pakistan, there is a 3% Christian population. Muslims and Christian people are equally supportive and respectful of the others beliefs and there is no judgment between the people. I found this as well, living in a Muslim country for so many years. Everyone was so welcoming and always so eager to wish me a Merry Christmas during the holidays. Where as back in Canada, it’s actually encouraged not to wish someone a Merry Christmas, instead it’s been replaced with “happy holidays”. heaven forbid you “offend” someone. The true meaning of this season has been forgotten. It is about Love, and oneness. And it’s so beautiful, that I get to experience that, in all it’s beautiful glory, here in Pakistan. . . A great big thank you to everyone who came out this day to make my Christmas one of the most memorable. Your effort is greatly appreciated and received with so much love. Bohat shukriya 🙏

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“I bought my first bike in Thailand. I had never even ridden before, but right away, I knew that this was the only way forward for me. I rode 12,000 km alone after that.” Since then, Rosie has ridden over 30 different types of motorcycles, from dirt bikes to big adventure bikes.

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. . WHY DO I RIDE ? . FREEDOM . The freedom to travel the unknown. Where time ceases to exist. The open road. The vessel in which transports my soul. Adventure is calling. To leave all my thoughts, cares and live in the ultimate presence. All my senses are enthralled. The wind on my skin, the pounding pavement beneath my feet, the soft aromas in my passing. As my heart races from the adrenaline rush, I know, this is my healing time. Riding is my happy place, where I forget all of my worries. Experiencing every ounce of life and the magic it has to offer. Seeing the smiles on people’s faces as you pass and connecting to everything around you. It’s a place where I am my true self. Taking me from my disenchanted reality to nirvana. When I’m on a bike, I feel like I can conquer the world. . .This is my FREEDOM, what’s yours ? . . .📸 @adeelamer #travelbeautifulpakistan

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Gabrielle started traveling solo 17 years ago, and while that may seem odd to some, she wouldn’t have it any other way. “I enjoy my time alone, it’s not scary,” she tells us.

According to Gabrielle, traveling alone as a female actually gives her an advantage. “People don’t see you as a threat and they want to help you and take care of you,” she says.

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WHAT BROKE ME INTO TEARS . I’ve had So many amazing experiences so far here in Pakistan. One that was particularly special was my time at the Bullah Shah Tomb in Kasur. The shrine was built after the death of The Sufi Poet and people from all parts of Pakistan came to pray there. In Islamic culture, it’s typical that men and women Pray in separate areas. I met the elder who was guardian of the tomb she blessed me, and told me how to pray there. After offering my prayers, the woman informed me she was a descendent of Bullah Shah, then took me inside the tomb where only men are permitted. This was a HUGE honor and privilege, something unique. Standing in this room, I could feel the intense pulses of energy. My channel was clear and direct. It was a message that all beings would be as one. That there was no separation between you or I. That the veins of life stretched out and connected each of us, flowing the energy of love and oneness. I returned back that evening, to continue my prayers in this magical place. And it was then that it struck me so deep. Tears began to role down my cheek. I, as a foreign female, who is non Muslim, have been so accepted into this culture. Without judgment, without question. I’ve been treated as family and given So MUCH love, and kindness, so genuine and pure in heart. My heart hurt. Deeply. Knowing that this world, has such a negative view on Muslim people and of Pakistan. That they have NO idea what Islam is actually about or the true heart of these people. That THEY are the ones terrorizing these beautiful peaceful souls. If they only knew. That Muslims, and Pakistani people, are model citizens for the entire WORLD. For all of humanity. That Islam is peace and LOVE. And I, traveling as a solo female here in Pakistan, have only received the highest of care and attention, from all people. This is how we SHOULD be to one another. But this is not how it is in the west. There is too much fear, anger, hate. Which is what lead me to my desperate cry on my stories last week. The world needs to wake up. This is NOT how we were meant to live. And I hope that by me sharing, people will be inspired to open their hearts.

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Traveling alone has given her the opportunity to meet new people. “People are always curious, they want to know more about me and I’ve had many amazing encounters this way,” she tells us.

When asked if the idea of visiting Pakistan ever scared her, she answered with a resounding no.

“As a seasoned traveler, I know not to listen when people tell me a place isn’t safe. I heard the same when I was planning to go to South Africa a few years ago, but I went anyway,” she says.

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I can’t believe it’s been over one month now in Pakistan ! So much has gone on, so many new adventures every day! I’ve been staying with the most amazing family here in Lahore who have basically adopted me as their daughter and treated me as one of the family. And thanks to @theharleystore and my new Bhai @adeelamer I’ve had some epic rides through the city and gotten to explore Lahore on some very beautiful bikes! I have just received the bike that I will be using to cross Pakistan on (hint: it’s not a Harley) and will be leaving soon on the grand adventure ! I’m too excited to share with you my experience here in Pakistan. The real Pakistan. Stay tuned on my Instagram stories to see which bike it is and all the amazing adventures to come ! . . A massive thank you also to @walledcitylahore for giving us special permission to shoot at the Lahore fort 🙏 📸 @adeelamer

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“There was an inquisitive charm luring me to experience the real side of the country and find out first-hand just what it was like there. Unlike what the media has to say about Pakistan, the travelers I’ve spoken to have only ever had amazing things to say about it,” she writes on Instagram.

 

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🇵🇰PAKISTAN When someone mentions this country; what are your initial thoughts? What are the general feelings and images, that that media portrays about Pakistan? . I can tell you -in my experience, there aren’t many good things said. “It’s dangerous, they are terrorists, you will be raped or killed, it’s filthy, you will be treated badly as a female”, were just a few of the “cautions” that were told to me when I mentioned to people that I wanted to come to Pakistan. And these judgments came from all over the world and from many people. This is the misconception, this is the issue. And this is what I’m here to change. The only news that sells is bad news. So the media over dramatizes things, sells lies and instills fear in the minds of the masses so it has control and something to sell. Has Pakistan had an unfortunate past and been through devastation, yes. But now the country is free again and open to experience the true heart of this place. Are there still dangerous areas? Every country has their questionable places and you need to use common discernment. You wouldn’t walk in a back alley in NYC at 3 am and expect to be "okay. So being informed and aware any place you go is advisable. But listen to the right sources. People are very quick to tell you the bad things, even if they aren’t true. I’m not going to sugar coat things and only tell you fluffy good stories, but I will definitely focus more on the positive aspect of what I personally see and my experiences here. Which are; I feel exceptionally safe here. As a woman I do not feel objectified or looked down on. I am highly respected by everyone I meet. I’m not judged. The hospitality here is unlike any place I’ve ever visited. The people are so pure, genuine and kind; and that’s every person I’ve met- from the passing of individuals on the street, to people who welcome me in their home. Every single person I’ve met has been a gracious beautiful soul. The food is amazing and the culture is so diverse. Very soon I’ll be leaving on my bike to cross the country to share with you the REAL Pakistan. Not the crap you see in the news. Never believe what you hear until you’ve experienced it firsthand.

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Rosie was invited to visit Pakistan by none other than Huzaifa Ubaid Khan, a Pakistani expat based in Oman. Despite living abroad, Huzaifa’s love for Pakistan runs deep, and it was this love that fueled the fire in him to start his Pakistan Awaits initiative. Huzaifa organizes group trips to Pakistan, keen to show the world a different side to the country often portrayed negatively in mainstream media.

Rosie began her three month journey through Pakistan on a week-long project with the folks from Pakistan Awaits. Now, she continues to ride solo through the country, sharing stories of the kindness, compassion and love she has received from people she’s met along the way.

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All you need in life in ROSIE ROTI . . Is a popular saying here in Pakistan. “Rosie” translating to income, and Roti (flat bread) representing food. . . As I was walking down the small narrow streets just outside the walled city, I came across a man making Chapati. Chapati is a type of Roti, just thinner (It would be the same as a crepe). His name was Gulam Shabir. He had been making Roti’s professionally for 23 years. One by one he needed and tossed the dough effortlessly producing a golden hot crispy chapati within seconds to sell to the local vendors and passerby’s. I watched in mesmerized awe as he did this. The man in the stall next to him offered me a drink as I begun to take some fun photos of him flipping the bread. Next thing I know, I was invited to try it myself. How could I say no! I can definitely tell you, they sure make it look easy. There’s a real skill and knack to producing a perfectly round roti to which I failed miserably at. But, despite my failed attempts at being a Roti master, I did have the most amazing time. Laughing and connecting with this beautiful soul. Just the look on his face as we interacted and had fun was priceless. After, we were offered pakora curry to eat with our freshly made chapatis. It was delicious ! And like my previous experiences, they did not accept any payment. . . Touched by the entire experience, the gifted food, and my new friend, With a heart full of gratitude I thanked him. For the whole experience, for his presence and for this beautiful encounter and my feeling about Pakistan people and what this meant to me. To which Gulam Shabir replied; Pakistan people are LOVE. It is our pleasure. . . So, it’s not “Rosie or Roti” we need to survive. It is LOVE. Pure unconditional Love and connection 💗 . . Thank you Gulam for representing not only your people and Country, but what humanity should be. 🇵🇰 💗

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So far, she’s seen Lahore, Swat and Malam Jabba. She’s currently in Multan and plans to ride all the way to Gwadar. She’ll be stopping along the way of course, and plans to visit a multitude of cities including Sukkur, Hyderabad and Karachi.

While she hasn’t seen enough of Pakistan to decide which city she’s liked most, Lahore has a special place in her heart.

According to Gabrielle, it isn’t the physical aspects that make a city what it is, it’s the experiences and the people.

“I’ve had so many incredible moments here in Pakistan,” she says, “and its really just meeting people and getting to experience kindness on a whole another level that’s so humbling.”

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PUHKTUN People … historically known as ethnic Afghans. They are an Iranian ethnic group, who mainly live in Pakistan and Afghanistan. They speak the Pashto language and adhere to Pashtunwali, which is a traditional set of ethics guiding individual and communal conduct. They are a minority group in Pakistan constituting 15% of the population. They reside in the foothills of Swat valley , the northern areas of Baluchistan and the north west province KPK. They have a very unique way of life and the culture is completely different to the rest of Pakistan. They dress differently, have their own variation of foods, music, traditions, morals and values. They even look altogether different. You will find a lot of very pale skinned people and some with the most stunning blue/green eyes. The kind of rare features I’ve only ever seen in National Geographic magazine. Mesmerizing. A deep seed to the soul. The Pakhtun’s are proud, gentle and kind people, with some of the greatest hospitality and biggest hearts you will ever experience. It was truly amazing to see this culture and meet so many wonderful people! I can’t wait to return to this region in the summer on my own and explore the incredible region and witness and learn about new cultures and people. Pakistan is so diverse and the people are truly remarkable inside and out.

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She’s shared a number of stories on Instagram documenting the kindness she was met with in the city. While riding through the streets of Lahore, Rosie came across a food stall, and of course the delicious smells drew her in. She was invited by the stall owner – Aunty – to try the food and join her and her granddaughter for dinner.

“The food was a gift. She said that I was a guest in her country and it was her honor and duty to show me grace and love. She explained to me that, in Islam, it is taught by Prophet Muhammad (P.B.U.H) to love and care for one another, and to offer food to others. That it’s through her religion and faith that she is kind and hospitable to others. That being a Muslim means peace and love,” Gabrielle writes on Instagram.

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HOSPITALITY in PAKISTAN; … … Is by far the most gracious care I have ever received. And it was explained to me by this Aunty that I met on the street. As I was walking down the back streets of the walled city in Lahore, I came across this lovely smelling food stall and went to have a closer look. It was then that Aunty and I met. She kindly insisted that I try the food and to join her and her granddaughter for dinner. The food was a gift she said. That I was a guest in her country and it was her honor and duty to show me grace and love. She explained to me that, in Islam, it is taught from Prophet Muhammad to love and care for one another, and to offer food to others. That it’s through her religion and faith that she is kind and hospitable to others. That being a Muslim means peace and love. After we ate, she continued to tell me her story and about her life. As I stood listening to her for some time, I held her hand. And although I didn’t know the direct translation of what she was saying in Urdu, I knew. I felt every word she said. The connection went much deeper. This is real human connection, this is ONENESS. You don’t need to speak the same language to connect with someone. You don’t have to have the same religion or have the same ideas to be kind and loving towards one another. We are all one. Pakistan has been a beautiful example of love and kindness. I’ve traveled to many Islamic countries . And although the hospitality is always AMAZING, there is something truly extra special about the people here and their exceptional giving hearts. And THIS is what I want to share with the WORLD !

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Pakistan is known for its spicy food and Rosie has been thoroughly enjoying it!

“It’s actually too good (the food), because I’ve gained 3 kilos here. Spice definitely isn’t an issue, I’ve actually got better spice tolerance than some of my Pakistani friends,” she tells us.

Rosie has also had street side chai in Lahore, and tea seller Ali also refused compensation, insisting that Rosie was a guest in his Pakistan. She returned the gesture by giving him a printed photograph she took of him.

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This is Ali, a shop keeper at the Walled city in Lahore. A couple weeks ago we came here to visit the area. Our bikes were parked just opposite Ali’s shop and took rest at the wall After a long ride. Ali served us some Peshawari kava (tea) and some goodies from his shop. Afterwards, we tried to pay for the tea, but he didn’t accept it. He said that as a guest in his country, it was his honor to host me and gift this to me. I kindly thanked him and we chatted for some time. He asked how my experience was so far in Pakistan, I said it was amazing, that the people were truly so wonderful! He explained to me that, yes, Pakistan was safe and the people were about peace. And that life is about love and connectivity, that whatever the energy you put out, is what you will receive, so we must care for one another. I couldn’t agree more. And this has been my mantra my whole life. People ask all the time if I’m afraid traveling alone or have ever encountered someone bad. In 14 years, all I have received is love and kindness. Because I see everyone as equal, I treat everyone with respect and connect to the hearts of the people. People are not bad, they have just been through hard times. If they are triggered, they may react from the space of fear and trauma. But, if you send love and create a safe space for them, you will see the real human heart. We were created for oneness. We were created to love. Yesterday, I went back to surprise my friend Ali with a printed photo I took of him. To show him my appreciation of his kind heart, his beautiful being. This is what life is about. These small gestures and connections. Every moment in your day, you have the opportunity to make a difference in someone’s life, to connect with them, love them, and show you care. Whether it be a cup of tea, a smile or a kind gesture. Take the time to connect with one another and feel the difference in the energy around you and within your heart 💗 let the people of Pakistan be a model of love for the world. . . Oh- and if you didn’t see my Instagram stories- this is the bike I will be crossing Pakistan on. 😁 #bmwf700gs 👍🎉

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We all know how important round rotis are, and Rosie made sure to learn how to make some while in Lahore. It’s safe to say her attempt didn’t go to well, but has anyone made the perfect roti their first time around? (Please note the pun).

Rosie’s pretty much seen every inch of Lahore during the past few weeks, and of course that includes a visit to none other than Liberty Market, where she met her very own Pakistani namesake, Gulab! The two had a blast trying on traditional clothing and jewelry, and Gulab was sure to treat Rosie to some Kashmiri chai!

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. “My name is GULAB, it means the rose flower” No WAY ?!? My name is ROSIE !! It’s the same 😍 . . And that was the beginning of a beautiful evening 💗 Walking down the back streets of Liberty market in Lahore, I came across a series of small shops selling an array of exquisite colorful fabrics, clothing and handy crafts. These are from the Sindh region I was told. Just then, a man came from his shop to invite me in. His name was Gulab, which just so happened to translate the same as my name! When he introduced himself, and we realized we shared the same name, we both burst into happy laughter. Gulab shared with me the origin and details of the shops collection. They came from his village in Mithi, a region of Pakistan known as Sindh. The women of the Thar desert worked diligently to create these elaborate pieces of art. It’s their main source of income. The people of this region are very poor and have very little but are very rich in culture. I was told about the beautiful traditional dresses and how local women are garnished with silver and the unmarried girls have bangles up their entire arms ! Gulab let me try on the dresses (ghagra) also a Peshawari karag (diff region) and decorated me with a traditional matha Patti (headdress) and even showed me the different ways the women would wear their shall. Then, to my surprise, I got a grand show of the traditional hip dance that the men do in Sindh. Gulab was a special character with a very kind heart ❤️ he treated my friend and I to Kashmiri chai and invited me to come to his village when I pass through the area so that I can meet the women who make the garments and see the process. . . . As I start my route across Pakistan and I am too excited to see all of this beauty, to meet these incredible people, and to share the diverse culture of Pakistan with the world !

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Rosie’s heartfelt messages and stories from Pakistan have garnered quite a bit of foreign interest.

“That’s the power of social media, I’ve received so many messages from people telling me they want to visit Pakistan,” she says. Unfortunately, other than in Malam Jabba, Rosie has yet to see a single foreigner in Pakistan.

“The security is very excessive here for foreigners, which is understandable, but it makes it very difficult for foreigners to travel here,” she tells us. Her contacts have allowed her to travel without a personal guard, but others may not find themselves to be as lucky.

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Taking a moment from the busy chaos of life, to gather myself and ground back into myself. . . I’m a person who is adaptable in all situations. I love adventure, I love chaotic city streets, endless scenic mountain scapes, being around lots of new people, or embracing the quiet of being alone. Soaking in the very essence of life and all it has to offer. But when the energy is constantly on high, the days are long, and I’m not able to get the rest my body requires. I start to shut down. I burn out, and burn out fast. Finding the balance is key, and making sure to listen to your body and take the time needed to recharge. I found this, in the first week I got to Pakistan, I started the trip on a lack of sleep and overdoing it, knowing very well how my body would react. Sometimes we’re thrown into situations that are above our control. And instead of focusing on the chaos, we need to find the quiet inner peace to keep going. When there is too much happening, too much stimulation, we lose or way and it’s hard to get back on track. I had a beautiful moment at the walled city, where I took the time and set the intention to find myself again when everything around me was crumbling. In just a short time I Felt like a new person. It’s easy to get caught up with life, the hustle bustle and all the fun things to do, but it’s important to always come back to center when things get to be too much. And try to stay in that space as much as possible. . Still feeling quiet burnt out from all the activities, I haven’t been able to catch up on the rest I need as there is always so much to see and do here ! needing a good recharge before I set out on the open road. As much as I’m eager to get out there, I also know that I have to take care of myself and go at an easy pace. It’s not easy traveling with chronic health conditions and my body no longer allows me to push it as I did in the past. I still want to live my dreams and continue to travel and inspire people. So finding that balance, listening to my body and taking the proper time to rest between is key. . . 📸 @cavemangram

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We asked Rosie what she wants the world to know about Pakistan, and here’s what she had to say:

“It’s hard to sum it up because I’ve taken a different approach and have gone deeper than most people do when they visit. The kindness that has been displayed, it comes from such a beautiful, deep place in the heart. I think people could really learn something from those in Pakistan and it breaks my heart to hear the negative things people have to say.”

“I actually burst into tears this one time because as a female, non-Muslim foreigner I feel so accepted and welcomed here – not only in public places but also into homes and places of worship. People wouldn’t do that in Canada or the US, and it’s very humbling.”

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The Lahore Fort in the walled city, is quite the magical place. It’s vast in its size spreading across an impressive area of over 20 hectares spanning the greater part of Lahore city. You really need a few days to take in all it’s beauty. And I’ve quite literally done that. I’ve now spent a total of 4 days exploring the grounds taking in all its magnificence, and I could go back 100 more times. . . I still remember the first time I went to visit. I sat under a tree for some time taking in the beautiful energy. I had a particularly hard day that day with a lot of chaos in my head and bad energy around me and was trying to regroup myself. As I came from my meditation and was feeling a bit better, a friendly face approached me. Immediately lighting my heart up with his smile. His name was Irfan. He was the guard on the premises. He was so elated to see me, asking where I was from and wanting to know what I thought of Pakistan. He then invited me to pass through the closed gates so that I could take a special photo in front of the fort. I felt very privileged and was grateful for his gesture. He had the sweetest smile and a gentle manor. It’s funny though, as soon as the camera comes out they become so serious. I won’t forget his smile though, or his invitation. Or the reminder I received from his encounter and experience. That how this small kind gesture made me feel so happy and took me out of my troubled place. How not to focus on the chaos around me but to relish in the present moment and all the beauty that lays in front of me. That each encounter and opportunity to connect is such a blessing. And if we take the time to open our hearts ,we can heal each other. . . 📸 @cavemangram

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Rosie still has the South of Pakistan left to explore on this trip, but that isn’t enough for the Canadian adventurer. “I plan on coming back this August to visit the Northern areas, I just have to go back to Canada first so I can bring my dog!” she tells us.

We can’t wait to see the rest of her journey through social media. Let us know what you think of her adventures in Pakistan in the comments below!

 

This Female Instagrammer Motivates Pakistani Women To Travel The World And It’s SUPER Inspiring

I Traveled To The Karakoram Highway And Fell In Love With Pakistan’s Beauty All Over Again


Cover image via Rosie Gabrielle/Instagram

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Pakistanis Can’t Stop Obsessing Over Kate Middleton & Prince William Finally Meeting Imran Khan

15 Oct, 2019
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Ushna Shah Is Being Dragged For Taunting Her Food Delivery Guy

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15 Of The Most Savage ‘Usman Jokes’ That Your Friend Usman Definitely Needs To See

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A Student Gave Up On Life Because He Got A Bad Result And It’s Everything That’s Wrong With Our Society

14 Oct, 2019
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People Are Legit Pissed That ‘Ehd E Wafa’ Copied ‘Peaky Blinders’ In Last Night’s Episode

14 Oct, 2019