A Pakistan City Just Ranked As The World's Second Hottest And It's Time You Paid Some Actual Fucking Attention Now

By Owais Bin Asad | 8 Jun, 2019

A Pakistani city ranked the second hottest and you’re still not paying attention

Ramazan is over and if you ask anyone who fasted through the month, it was tough. Fasting is a tough task in itself but the particularly high temperatures sure didn’t help either. The Pakistan-India region has always had very high temperatures in the summers with some cities peaking the charts at 50 degrees Celsius but things are especially alarming right now and it’s high time everyone pays attention to it.

 

According to a weather monitoring website, El Dorado, 15 of the world’s hottest cities are in India and Pakistan

Recently, the top 15 hottest cities in the world (and I don’t mean in a glamorous way) were in India and Pakistan. Just let that sink in. There are 195 countries and at least 4416 cities in the world. The hottest 15 were all located in the same region. This really says something about the climatic conditions of the Indian subcontinent.

On the Pakistani side, Jacobabad topped the charts with a scorching high of 51 degrees Celsius. Then you have the cities that were in the range of 45 to 50 degrees Celsius. These included Multan, Lahore, Larkana, Rohri, Rahim Yar Khan, Bahawalnagar, and a few more.

On the Indian side, Churu in northern Rajhistan hit a high of 48.9 degrees Celsius. The government issued an emergency in local hospitals and schools to cater to the heat wave.

Source: eldoradoweather.com

Just look at how many of those cities are in the Indian subcontinent. Thinking about temperatures as high as 48-50 degrees Celsius is easy, living in such conditions isn’t. Especially with the constant shortfall of electricity in this region and water management being a joke, people really suffer and end up falling sick due to the heat. A man even died in Rajhistan owing to the heat wave.

 

Our Met department has predicted bad news as well.

Pakistan Meteorological Department had predicted temperatures around 40 degrees Celsius in Karachi with humidity levels reaching up to 80% during Eid holidays. This is bad news everyone in Karachi as this made Eid celebrations quite difficult, making people prone to a heat stroke.

Source: pmdnmcc.net

 

This is not all, South Asia is one of the regions withe the most rapidly increasing temperatures and in less than 100 years from now this region will become unlivable for your children

According to the South China Morning Post, “if climate change continues at its current pace, deadly heatwaves beginning in the next few decades will strike parts of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, according to a study based on computer simulations by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).”

heatwave-lahoree
Source: samaa.tv

 

With the amount of suffering this will bring to the people, we need to seriously question our priorities.

Even though the monsoon season is about to start in a few days, the already desolate conditions of water management in the country will still cause problems. We are an agrarian economy, that means water is of the utmost importance. Yet the dam conditions in the country are…shady (excuse the ironic pun) to say the least.

We, the people of the subcontinent, really need to ask ourselves if wasting our time in pointless politics and shameless mudslinging on each other is worth it? Is that really more important than finding solutions for the ever-increasing water problems in both countries? Shayad aqal aa jaye.

sun-shining-heatwave
Source: rabi.org.uk

According to the World Bank, climate change can affect up to 800 million people just in South Asia. The World Health Organizations predicts an increase of 38,000 deaths per year owing to the increased temperatures between 2030 and 2050. Climate change will render parts of India and Pakistan uninhabitable. Just think about that. It could very well be your city if appropriate action isn’t taken against climate change.

As scary as it all sounds, there is still time for us to mend our ways. We need to think about how we spend our natural resources and we need to question the efficiencies of the methods we use in our daily lives and in industries. Only then will we able to curb this disastrous phenomenon.

 

Ex-Chief Justice, Saqib Nisar, Might Have Just Admitted That The Dam Fund Money Was Never To Build The Dam

A Pakistani’s Guide To Whatever The Heck Is Climate Change And Why You Need To Pay Attention

 


Cover image via: accuweather.com

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