This Pakistani Coffee Shop Just ‘Roasted’ Paresh Rawal After His Rude Accusation

This Pakistani Coffee Shop Just ‘Roasted’ Paresh Rawal After His Rude Accusation

India and Pakistan’s rising tension on the border has instead been picked up as a point-scoring contest by celebrities on both ends. While art remains a territory free of political boundaries and transcends differences as a superior means of self-expression, the not-so-friendly foes have been extremely vocal about wanting members of the art community to prove their nationalism by boycotting one another. Whether it was Karan Johar’s appeal to the masses to rise above the political differences, Mahesh Bhatt’s call for peace, Om Puri’s remarks on military,  Adnan Sami’s statement congratulating alleged drone strikes or Salman Ahmed’s fitting response to that statement: artists have been political if not politically correct.

Amidst this bedlam, actor and comedian Paresh Rawal also decided to speak up.

Source: apnatimepass
Source: apnatimepass

The funny man has many comedy movies to his credit with works like Andaaz Apna Apna, Ready, Aankhein, Golmaal and Hera Pheri being exceptionally popular in Pakistan as well.

Unlike his on-screen persona, Paresh Rawal seemed a tad bit hostile when he tweeted about Sattar Buksh Cafe in Pakistan:

Calling it a “China copy” in a derogatory way, Rawal mocked the local chain by putting together the logos of both brands claiming it as an infringement of copyrights.

Sattar Buksh, calling upon their spirit of good ol’ fashioned quirky sense of humor, replied in the friendliest of fashion:

 

And we were thoroughly amused.

 

So, what’s the deal with Starbucks and Sattar Buksh?

Source: Express Tribune
Source: Express Tribune

When the cafe first opened its doors three years ago, the resemblance was uncanny which turned out to be a brilliant marketing gimmick. The mustached face on the logo was allegedly added as a pun for the International Coffee Chain. When many talked about property intellectual rights violation and compensation fines for “imitation”, Starbucks ensued soon after. Calling this episode as a violation of their brand representation, ‘stealing’ their logo and their menu. The fact that the chain has survived three years should bear witness to their integrity and ability to overturn this accusation. The brand responded with stating that the term “Sattar Buksh” has been popular in this part of the world for decades before Starbucks was even conceived making for a irrefutable argument. Further, the restaurant and cafe serves an urban desi palette which ensures that all items on the menu are 100% original. The mere fact that the cafe serves tea as opposed to the specialty coffee by Starbucks should be enough to put the argument to bed once and for all.

Sattar Buksh light-hearted response to this whole debacle has shown that brands can be human and we are all very proud.

Update: the Tweet itself was from a parody account, but who cares because it so funny hehe haha



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